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Ryan W. Kennihan

Beach Road House . Galway

Ryan W. Kennihan . photos: © Shantanu Starick . + abitare

Connemara is a windswept, roughhewn, and endlessly beautiful landscape. The commonly heard phrase, ‘four seasons in a day’ speaks to the ever present weather that can be both debilitating and invigorating but also creates a perpetually changing and extraordinary display of light and colour each day. Travelling west and leaving behind the town of Clifden, one arrives at the shores of the Atlantic and the distinct feeling of being at the edge of the earth takes hold. ‘Here be Dragons’. Continue reading Ryan W. Kennihan

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Ryan W. Kennihan

Baltrasna House . Dublin

Ryan W. Kennihan . Baltrasna House . Dublin Aisling McCoy afasia (1)

Ryan W. Kennihan architects . photos: © Aisling McCoy

The site for this house contained a ruined farmhouse and barns that had been in the family since the early 1800’s. Its layout was typical of the vernacular farmhouse type with a series of simple pitched roof volumes arranged around several yards that provide shelter from the coastal weather. These buildings and yards accumulate incrementally over generations with new structures added to accommodate new uses. Continue reading Ryan W. Kennihan

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Ryan W. Kennihan

Kenilworth Park . Dublin

Ryan W. Kennihan . Kenilworth Park . Dublin Aisling McCoy afasia (1)

Ryan W. Kennihan Architects . photos: © Aisling McCoy

The existing Victorian semi-detached house is an interesting collage of disparate elements, materials and shapes, all unified by a simple timber beam painted white. We repeated this method of composition – collage unified by a simple beam – to the rear of the house to instil a conversation between old and new rather than a simple contrast. Continue reading Ryan W. Kennihan

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Ryan W. Kennihan

Clifden House. Galway

Ryan W. Kennihan . Clifden House. Galway (1)

Ryan W. Kennihan Architects

The site for this house is located on the edge of Clifden, a small town in the far West of Ireland. Despite its proximity to the centre of town, its location on the single high point in a floodplain along the Owenglin River means that the house will always sit as a singular object in the landscape. Regardless of the future development of the surrounding town, it will always remain a kind of isolated garden ‘folly’. Continue reading Ryan W. Kennihan