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KAAN

De Walvis . Amsterdam

KAAN . De Walvis . Amsterdam  AFASIA (1)

KAAN Architecten

The name “de Walvis” refers to a time when this part of Amsterdam housed ship- and dockyards. Built in 1964 by W.F. Lugthart, this office building on the waterfront of the Westerdok quay, has views of the IJ waterfront and the historic Amsterdam city centre and is part of the UNESCO canal belt. At that time, it was the first new office building on Bickerseiland. Four plots were planned, but neighbourhood residents rebelled and demanded a mix of residential and commercial properties for this area. De Walvis is now the only remaining office building on Bickerseiland. Although modern at its time, the building now no longer complies with contemporary day workplace standards. Continue reading KAAN

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KAAN Architecten

new multifunctional pavilion . Loenen

KAAN Architecten . new multifunctional pavilion .  Loenen afasia (1)

KAAN Architecten . renders: © PF Visual

The new multifunctional pavilion acts as a connecting element between the new National Veterans Cemetery and the existing Field of Honour. The landscape, originally designed in 1949 by garden and landscape architect D. Haspels and extended by Karres + Brands, is characterised by the contrast between open spaces and the dense forest. The rich woods, existing routes and the scenic qualities of this exceptional site have been used to underline the unifying role of the building. The design of the new centre consists of fluent open spaces, bound by a horizontally extended roof, blurring the transition between inside and outside. Upon entering the pavilion, the visitors experience the specific orientation of the building, which is positioned towards one of the sight lines of the Field of Honour with a central axis. In this way, the ceremonial route culminates with a view on the memorial cross seen from the auditorium of the pavilion. The flexible and logical organisation of the rooms and outdoor spaces gives the building a double function as a memorial venue and an educational pavilion informing visitors about the stories of war victims and veterans. The three main rooms, the auditorium, the exhibition space and the condolence room, form a harmonious ‘sequence’ that can be combined for a single ceremony or can be used independently by different groups at the same time.
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KAAN Architecten

Crematorium Siesegem . Aalst

© Simone Bossi

KAAN Architecten . + archdaily

Located in the countryside bordering the western ring road of the Belgian city, the crematorium, with its 74 x 74-meter footprint, merges with trees and shrubs that line the perimeter of the surrounding park, which was conceived by landscape architect Erik Dhont. Approaching the entrance at Blauwenbergstraat, a sense of calm pervades the site and upon arrival, visitors are subtly persuaded to slow down by the undulating gentle green mounds. To the north, a pond serves as a reservoir for rainwater, while small adjacent hills are dedicated to scattered ashes and to an urn garden. At the eastern end, there is a service road for the hearses that is entirely hidden from view so that families are not disturbed during the mourning ceremony, and so that privacy is respected. Continue reading KAAN Architecten