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David Adjaye

Batsheva Arts Center . Tel Aviv

Adjaye Associates

The architecture will negotiate a complex discourse of scale, materiality and form that exists between old Jaffa, the international style of the White City and the contemporary skyline of the evolving metropolis.
The new arts campus on the Old Central Bus Station site will create a cultural and social nucleus for the city of Tel Aviv. The architecture will negotiate a complex discourse of scale, materiality and form that exists between old Jaffa, the international style of the White City and the contemporary skyline of the evolving metropolis. The massing follows a reinterpretation of the city grid – from medieval to the modern – while playing with the complex geometry of the site. Designed as a series of gathering spaces for society, culture and the arts, the buildings are not conceived as singular objects, but rather as a frame. This framing allows the life of the campus to become fully animated – seducing new communities and offering the city a new “urban collector” at the culmination of Sderot Har Tzion and Yesof Hama’ala. Continue reading David Adjaye

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David Adjaye

Asaase . 2021

+ World-Architects

Asaase (2021), David Adjaye’s first large scale autonomous sculpture, was borne from his ongoing reflections on the origins of black architecture and its relationship to the earth. Referencing historic works of West African architecture such as the Tiébélé royal complex in Burkina Faso and the walled city of Agadez in Niger, the sculpture takes the form of a maze of nested earthen walls that climb to a conical vertex. Continue reading David Adjaye

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Adjaye Associates

Mole House . London

Adjaye Associates . Mole House . London Ed Reeve afasia (1)

Adjaye Associates . photos: © Ed Reeve . + detail

Mole House is a three-storey live-work space in the heart of Hackney, designed as a single-family dwelling for contemporary artist Sue Webster. The project came together as an exercise in excavation and retention, with Webster’s vision for the new home being strongly tied to the history and fabric of the original building. The detached Victorian house was left vacant and derelict after a 40-year long tenancy, held by a resident locally referred to as the Hackney Mole Man. Known for having spent years burrowing a network of tunnels beneath the property, his decades of organic digging yielded a subterranean system of multi-directional passageways. With the quarrying having seriously compromised structural integrity, the house was eventually seized and excavated. Its burrows were plugged with aerated concrete to re-establish structural safety and over 33 tonnes of debris were removed from site. Webster was compelled by the potential of the standalone property, captivated by its accumulated layers of history – both architectural and social. Continue reading Adjaye Associates