0

Wiel Arets

Am Hirschgarten buildings . Munich

Wiel Arets Architects (WAA)

Located on the western edge of Munich, near the Friedenheimer bridge, and adjacent to the light-rail lines that string throughout the city’s center, ‘Am Hirschgarten’ is a campus-like cluster of four buildings, each of which entails a tower, which rises from the base of every building’s plinth. The project’s urban planning requirements mandated economical, sustainable, and flexible buildings, whose programming could also accommodate a future conversion–for instance–into residential spaces. ‘Am Hirschgarten’ therefore constitutes four horseshoe-shaped buildings, each with a plinth of six to seven stories. A tower rises from each plinth–the pinnacle of which is 17-stories; it prominently cantilevers from its plinth, which creates a landmark within the project. Only steps away from the ‘Hirschgarten’ station along the city’s light-rail lines, and just a few hundred meters from multiple stops along the city’s tram lines, this campus-like cluster of four buildings is able to be swiftly accessed, throughout the entire city. Continue reading Wiel Arets

0

Wiel Arets

The Double . Amsterdam

Wiel Arets

On the eastern edge of Amsterdam’s city center lies the Valkenburgerstraat; a major thoroughfare that was created in the 1960s, the eastern half of which saw the buildings that align it completely demolished and rebuilt during the 1990s. The street’s western edge has retained its historic buildings, all of which are from different decades of the last century–the Double is the newest addition to it. Continue reading Wiel Arets

0

Wiel Arets Architects

regiocentrale zuid levee control center . maasbracht

Wiel Arets Architects . photos: © Jan Bitter . + dezeen

Situated in Maasbracht –near the Dutch-Belgian border– this sinuous 1.850 m2 office is a headquarters for the water traffic control of surrounding sluices, canals, and locks–all of which are adjacent to the river Meuse. This plethora of entangled waterways is heavily utilized for shipping throughout this area, at the confluence of France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands. Numerous previously disparate waterway control centers were combined to create this new office, and this regrouping determined its primary, curvilinear volume. This elevated polygonal shape strengthens visibility from the interior toward the immediate landscape, by allowing for elongated views in all 360-degrees. Continue reading Wiel Arets Architects